© Jan Bernhardtz

Group Exhibition

»Lost in the city«

Jan Bernhardtz & Stefan Vanthuyne

Opening: Thursday, April 7, 2016, 18:30h (Facebook Event)
Exhibition: April 8 – May 8, 2016
Finissage: Sunday, May 8, 2016, from 16h, with a photo projection
Opening hours: Thu & Fri 16-18h, Sat & Sun 11:30-13:30h, and by appointment
Admission free

Description

Lost In The City”, bringing together 2 photographers: Stefan Vanthuyne, based in Belgium, and another one based in Germany: Jan Bernhardtz, Swedish. The link between them: street photography & their own approach of “the city”, its people, its architecture.

Jan Bernhardtz (SE/DE)
Short biography.
Born in Umeå, Sweden Moved around Sweden: Örebro. Stockholm. Goteborg. etc.
Living in Berlin since 2011. Walking the streets taking photographs.
Main features in his pictures: traces of people, traces of the city’s past, a city that has moved the whole world through two world wars: bunkers, abandoned airfields, industries…

Jan about its work as a photographer and about the photo selection presented within Fotofabrik BLN BXL Exhibition:
« this project has been running over many years. I don’t want my pictures to be clear. I want the viewer to contemplate and interpret. They are not part of any projects. Mostly single images of what I have found. (…) The pictures are printed with carbon ink on aquarelle paper, black and white, monochrome, and feature abandoned places, street scenes, people – from Sweden, Poland, England, Italy and Germany.

Stefan Vanthuyne (BE)

Short biography
Stefan Vanthuyne (°1978) is a Belgian photographer and writer. He has published four artists’ books with his photographs. He also regularly writes about photography and photo books for several magazines.

Stefan on « Pulsar »
Walking in Brussels one day I passed by a wall with graffiti on it. Amongst the drawings was the word ‘Pulsar’ written in large.

According to Wikipedia (…) ‘a pulsar (short for pulsating radio star) is a highly magnetized, rotating neutron star that emits a beam of electromagnetic radiation. This radiation can only be observed when the beam of emission is pointing toward the Earth, much the way a lighthouse can only be seen when the light is pointed in the direction of an observer, and is responsible for the pulsed appearance of emission. Neutron stars are very dense, and have short, regular rotational periods.’

I spent most of the mornings and early evenings of September 2013 walking in Brussels. During those hours, the Indian summer light was strong and low and fiercely beaming its way through the streets. What if Brussels was a pulsar, an electromagnetic city shooting pulsed flares of light from its centre through the streets and parks, bursts of light that only get stopped by whatever was in its way?”

Finissage with Photo Projection on Sunday the 8th of May, 16.00

Event Details

© Jan Bernhardtz
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Weisestraße 30, 12049 Berlin, Germany

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